The Things Which We Have Seen and Heard

In my recent study of Ezekiel, I started to get a little confused. At certain points in the book, God tells Ezekiel that he is going to be mute. Then, in the very next verse or chapter, Ezekiel speaks to the people (see Ezek. 24:27 and 25:1, for example). I wondered, how can he be mute and also be speaking?

The answer lies in what he was speaking: the Word of God. He was restricted from speaking unless the word of the Lord came to him. This was explained back in Ezekiel 3:26-27, although I had forgotten about it: “I will make your tongue cling to the roof of your mouth, so that you shall be mute….But when I speak with you, I will open your mouth, and you shall say to them, ‘Thus says the Lord God…..”

The prophet Amos confirmed this experience: “The Lord God has spoken! Who can but prophesy?” (Amos 3:8) And when the Apostles were severely threatened by the Jewish Council and told not to speak in the name of Jesus anymore, they responded, “Uh, that’s all well and good, fellas, but we don’t really have a choice in the matter…for we cannot but speak the things which we have seen and heard!” (Acts 4:13-20).

It seems that when the Lord has something to reveal about Himself, there is no containing it. He speaks, the world is created. Whatever He says comes to pass. And we are privileged to have the Bible, which is God-breathed, living and active, and sharper than a two-edged sword (2 Tim. 3:16 and Heb. 4:12). How can we not study it, dwell on it, and memorize it? How can we not speak the things which we have seen and heard?

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